horse racing betting terms wikipedia english

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Horse racing betting terms wikipedia english 24hpoker betting trends

Horse racing betting terms wikipedia english

Wikipedia glossary. Retrieved 31 January Retrieved 1 August Retrieved 7 December Archived from the original on 30 June Retrieved 27 July Retrieved 8 October Archived from the original on 14 April Retrieved 26 July BBC News. Retrieved 4 August Retrieved 25 March Oze Punting. Archived from the original on 25 May Retrieved 3 November Daily Racing Form.

Retrieved 13 June Retrieved 20 May Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. Washington Thoroughbred Breeders Association. Retrieved 12 June New York: Macmillan. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Retrieved 10 August Blood Horse. The New York Times. Retrieved 2 July Betting on Horse Racing for Dummies. NY Daily News. Retrieved 18 June Archived from the original on 15 April Retrieved 19 June Handbook of the turf.

New York: Orange Judd Co. Retrieved 23 January Retrieved 20 December Dictionary or glossary of racing terms and slang. New York: Rogers and Sherwood. Retrieved June 11, Las Vegas Review-Journal. The Perfect Ride. New York: Citadel Press Books. Oxford Dictionaries. Retrieved 9 April New York Times. Retrieved July 4,

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Retrieved 1 August Retrieved 7 December Archived from the original on 30 June Retrieved 27 July Retrieved 8 October Archived from the original on 14 April Retrieved 26 July BBC News. Retrieved 4 August Retrieved 25 March Oze Punting.

Most of the horses have been purchased as yearlings, and are then broken in and ridden in preparation for them galloping at the sale. Also known as a National Hunt Flat race, and usually run over two miles without any obstacles.

Commonly used as a way to give horses race experience before tackling hurdles and fences. A form of headgear which consists of pieces of sheepskin placed on either side of the bridle and performs a similar job as blinkers in helping the horse to concentrate. A jockey who takes weight off a horse to compensate for their relative inexperience as a rider. Their claim is reduced the more winners they have.

Grade 1 contests confined to three-year-olds only in Britain. An uncastrated male horse aged four years old or younger. A colt older than four is referred to as an entire or horse if still racing or stallion if at stud. When the raceday judge cannot split two or more horses at the finishing-line, the prize is split between the horses and a dead-heat is called.

A formal notification from a trainer that notifies the racing authorities they intend to run a horse in a certain race. Horses are commonly declared at either the hour or hour stage prior to a race. The type of obstacle jumped during chase races. There are different types of fence, including an open-ditch, the water jump and a plain fence.

The form may also include some letters, for example F denoting a fall. An imperial unit of distance measurement in horseracing. A furlong is an eighth of a mile or a little more than metres. The highest quality of race. Grade or Group 1 races are the highest quality, with Grade 2 and Grade 3 races a slightly lower quality. A type of race in which horses carry different weights depending on their overall rating, which is determined by the handicapper.

The obstacles jumped during a hurdle race. They are smaller than fences and therefore take less jumping. Sometimes referred to as flights. Refers to anything that happens during a race, and could refer to in-running betting markets or in-running race comments.

The length of a horse from its nose to the start of its tail, and a measurement used to describe the distances between horses at the finish line. Known as jumps racing. One of two racing codes, the other being Flat. National Hunt racing is best known in Britain and Ireland. They can help prevent the horse from getting its tongue over the bit which can obstruct its breathing.

A race for horses who are in their first season in that code of racing. Can have age specific conditions, particularly on the Flat. A close race finish, requiring the raceday judge to consult a photo before declaring the winner or a dead-heat. A photo can also help determine the placings behind the winner.

A horse who is keen during a race and wants to go faster than its jockey is allowing. Often described as pulling for its head. A programme giving information about the races scheduled during a race meeting and the horses set to run in them. A phrase frequently used by race commentators or in post-race comments referring to a horse who finished strongly during the closing stages. A visor differs from blinkers as it has a small slit in the eye cups.

Every horse in a race has to carry a certain amount of weight. To ensure it does, all jockeys must weight out both before and after a race. Guide to Racing. Racing Term. The status of a race or racecourse described as closed, usually as a result of bad weather. The age of a horse. A synthetic racing surface usually made from sand, which generally is not affected by the weather. The deduction in the weight a horse must carry.

A horse not fit or fully developed. A supposedly certain bet. Betting ring. Black type. A race which is of Listed or Group class. Boxed in. When a horse cannot obtain a clear run during a race due to other horses being in close proximiity.

A mare female horse at stud who is kept with the aim of producing a foal. Brought down. Used to describe a horse who falls because of another horse, rather than falling independently. A race run over fences. Clerk of the course. The person responsible for the overall management of a racecourse on a raceday. Mother of a horse. A female horse aged four or younger. A horse aged younger than one.

A training strip used to exercise horses. Trainers have access to either their own private gallops or public gallops. A horse who has been castrated, often to improve its temperament. The underfoot conditions at the racecourse. A device used to measure the underfoot conditions at the racecourse. Graded race. Hacked up.

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The emphasis in this list is on gambling terms, rather than the breeding or veterinary side of horse racing. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the Australian English usage of punting. For other uses, see punt disambiguation and punter disambiguation. Wikipedia glossary. Retrieved 31 January Retrieved 1 August Retrieved 7 December Archived from the original on 30 June Retrieved 27 July Retrieved 8 October Archived from the original on 14 April Retrieved 26 July BBC News.

Retrieved 4 August A bet to win , sometimes called a "straight" bet, means staking money on the horse, and if it comes in first place, the bet is a winner. In a bet to place , you are betting on your horse to finish either first or second. A bet to show wins if the horse finishes first, second or third. Since it is much easier to select a horse to finish first, second, or third than it is to select a horse just for first, the show payoffs will be much lower on average than win payoffs.

If there are a small number of horses in the race, show or place bets may not be offered or if bets have already been made, they are cancelled and the wagered amounts refunded. In Europe, Australia, and Asia, betting to place is different since the number of "payout places" varies depending on the size of the field that takes part in the race. For example, in a race with seven or less runners in the UK, only the first two finishers would be considered winning bets with most bookmakers.

Three places are paid for eight or more runners, whilst a handicap race with 16 runners or more will see the first four places being classed as "placed". A show bet in the North American sense does not exist in these locations. An each-way bet sees the total bet being split in two, with half being placed on the win, and half on the place. The full odds are paid if the horse wins, plus the place portion , with a quarter or a fifth of the odds depending on the race-type and the number of runners if only the place section of the bet is successful.

In the UK some bookmakers will pay for the first five some independent firms have even paid the first six for a place on the Grand National. This additional concession is offered because of the large number of runners in the race maximum Occasionally other handicap races with large fields numbers of runners receive the same treatment from various bookmakers, especially if they are sponsoring the race.

Each portion is treated by the totalizator as a separate bet, so an across-the-board bet is merely a convenience for bettors and parimutuel clerks. In addition to straight wagers, "exotic" wagers offer bettors an opportunity to incorporate the placement of different horses in one or multiple races. The two broad types of exotic wagers are horizontal and vertical.

Horizontal exotic wagers are bets on multiple horses in one particular race, while vertical exotic wagers involve predicting results across multiple races. Both have specific options for which bets are available and are detailed below. In the most basic horizontal wager, an exacta , the bettor selects the first and second place horses in the exact order.

Picking the first three finishers in exact order is called a trifecta and a superfecta refers to the specific finishing order of the top four horses. Boxing is a tactic that increases the odds of winning an exotic wager by removing the need to choose the exact order. A quinella , which boxes an exacta allowing the first two finishers to come in any order and still win , is the basic box, but boxing can be applied to the trifecta and superfecta as well.

In a sense, a win bet can be thought of as a specific type of wheel bet. Vertical bets are spread over different races. A daily double is an exotic wager placed on the winner of two consecutive races. Picking the winner of three, four, five or six straight races is referred to as a pick-3 , pick-4 , pick-5 and pick-6 respectively. In addition to traditional betting with a bookmaker, punters bettors are able to both back and lay money on an online betting exchange.

Punters who lay the odds are in effect acting as a bookmaker. The odds of a horse are set by the market conditions of the betting exchange which is dictated to by the activity of the members. By the late 19th century over tracks were in operation in the country but those opposed to gambling caused the banning of bookmakers and horse racing at the beginning of the next century.

In pari-mutuel tote betting was introduced, helping the industry to prosper and that has continued to be the case to the present day. Pari-mutuel betting is currently legal in 32 US states. Due to new legislation horse race betting in the US could change significantly in the near future. Hong Kong generates the largest horse racing revenue in the world and is home to some of the largest horse betting circles including the Hong Kong Jockey Club founded in Betting on horse racing is ingrained in local culture and is seen as an investment.

The revenue the club generate from various wagers makes it the largest taxpayer for the government.

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Belmont Park is part of the western edge of the Hempstead Plains. Its mile-and-a-half main track is the largest dirt Thoroughbred race course in the world, and it has the sport's largest grandstand. One of the latest major horse track opened in the United States was the Meadowlands Racetrack opened in for Thoroughbred racing. It is the home of the Meadowlands Cup. Other more recently opened tracks include Remington Park , Oklahoma City , opened in , and Lone Star Park in the Dallas—Fort Worth Metroplex , opened in ; the latter track hosted the prestigious Breeders' Cup series of races in The Hall of Fame honors remarkable horses, jockeys , owners, and trainers.

In North America, most racehorses are stabled in the backstretch of the racetrack at which their trainers are based. The backstretch has extensive facilities to house the horses and workers. In the United States, Thoroughbred flat races are run on either dirt, synthetic or turf surfaces.

Other tracks offer Quarter Horse racing and Standardbred horse racing, or combinations of these three types of racing surfaces. Racing with other breeds, such as Arabian horse racing, is found on a limited basis. American Thoroughbred races are run at a wide variety of distances, most commonly from 5 to 12 furlongs 0. The shorter distances are more common but the mid-to-long distance races tend to be higher in prestige.

With this in mind, breeders of Thoroughbred race horses attempt to breed horses that excel at a particular distance see Dosage Index. The Pleasanton Fairgrounds Racetrack at the Alameda County Fairgrounds is the oldest horse racing track in America [ citation needed ] , dating back to , when it was founded by the sons of the Spaniard Don Agustin Bernal. In , the first racetrack was constructed on Long Island. It is the oldest Thoroughbred race in North America.

The length of an endurance race varies greatly. Some are very short, only ten miles, while others can be up to one hundred miles. There are a few races that are even longer than one hundred miles and last multiple days. The Arabian horse was developed by the Bedouin people of the Middle East specifically for stamina over long distances, so they could outrun their enemies. It was not until that the Arabian was introduced into the United States.

Until the formation of the Arabian Horse Registry of America in , Arabians were recorded with the Jockey Club in a separate subsection from Thoroughbreds. They must be able to withstand traveling long distances at a moderate pace. Arabians have an abundance of Type I fibers. Their muscles are able to work for extended periods of time. Also, the muscles of the Arabian are not nearly as massive as those of the Quarter Horse, which allow it to travel longer distances at quicker speeds.

The Arabian is primarily used today in endurance racing , but is also raced over traditional race tracks in many countries. The ancestors of the Quarter Horse were prevalent in America in the early 17th century. These horses were a blend of Colonial Spanish horses crossed English horses that were brought over in the s.

The native horse and the English horse were bred together, resulting in a compact muscular horse. At this time, they were mainly used for chores such as plowing and cattle work. The American Quarter Horse was not recognized as an official breed until the formation of the American Quarter Horse Association in The Quarter Horse has much larger hind limb muscles than the Arabian, which make it much less suitable for endurance racing. When Quarter Horse racing began, it was very expensive to lay a full mile of track so it was agreed that a straight track of four hundred meters, or one quarter of a mile would be laid instead.

There is less jockeying for position, as turns are rare, and many races end with several contestants grouped together at the wire. The track surface is similar to that of Thoroughbred racing and usually consists of dirt. They are all held early in the year, throughout May and the beginning of June. The Breeders' Cup event is held in late October or early November at different race tracks every year. It receives less attention than the Triple Crown series from the general public but is of great importance in determining the American Horse of the Year and annual Eclipse Award divisional winners.

It is normally held at a different track every year, though some racetracks have held back-to-back renewals. Also, the main Standardbred event is the Breeders Crown. Thoroughbred and Arabian fillies have their own "Triple" series, commonly referred to as The Triple Tiara. American betting on horse racing is sanctioned and regulated by the state the racetrack is located in.

Simulcast betting almost always exist across state lines with no oversight except the companies involved through legalized parimutuel gambling. A takeout, or "take", is removed from each betting pool and distributed according to state law, among the state, race track and horsemen. A close race finish, requiring the raceday judge to consult a photo before declaring the winner or a dead-heat.

A photo can also help determine the placings behind the winner. A horse who is keen during a race and wants to go faster than its jockey is allowing. Often described as pulling for its head. A programme giving information about the races scheduled during a race meeting and the horses set to run in them.

A phrase frequently used by race commentators or in post-race comments referring to a horse who finished strongly during the closing stages. A visor differs from blinkers as it has a small slit in the eye cups. Every horse in a race has to carry a certain amount of weight. To ensure it does, all jockeys must weight out both before and after a race.

Guide to Racing. Racing Term. The status of a race or racecourse described as closed, usually as a result of bad weather. The age of a horse. A synthetic racing surface usually made from sand, which generally is not affected by the weather. The deduction in the weight a horse must carry.

A horse not fit or fully developed. A supposedly certain bet. Betting ring. Black type. A race which is of Listed or Group class. Boxed in. When a horse cannot obtain a clear run during a race due to other horses being in close proximiity. A mare female horse at stud who is kept with the aim of producing a foal.

Brought down. Used to describe a horse who falls because of another horse, rather than falling independently. A race run over fences. Clerk of the course. The person responsible for the overall management of a racecourse on a raceday. Mother of a horse. A female horse aged four or younger. A horse aged younger than one. A training strip used to exercise horses. Trainers have access to either their own private gallops or public gallops. A horse who has been castrated, often to improve its temperament.

The underfoot conditions at the racecourse. A device used to measure the underfoot conditions at the racecourse. Graded race. Hacked up. A phrase used to describe a horse who has won comfortably. An official who assesses how horses should be rated, based on their previous performances. A two-year-old horse. Listed race. A horse who has yet to win a race. A female horse aged five or older. A bet considered to be the most likely winner of all bets during the day.

National Hunt. A measurement used to describe a winning margin in a close finish. A short head is the smallest winning margin. A horse withdrawn from a race for which it had been declared. A handicap race for two-year-old horses. The chance offered for a selection to win. Also known as price. Off the bridle. A term to describe a horse not travelling well. On the bridle. A term to describe a horse travelling well. A term used to describe a horse who cannot quicken when the tempo of the race increases.

Open ditch. A fence with a ditch on the take-off side, forcing the horse to make a longer jump than at a plain fence. A horse whose chance of winning is considered unlikely by the market. A horse who races with the aim of ensuring the even tempo of race, thus helping a stablemate who would benefit. The area of a racecourse where horses are paraded before each race. Often referred to as the parade ring.

Parade ring. Also referred to as the paddock. Photo finish. Pulled up. A horse who is brought to a halt during a race by its jockey. Someone who has had a bet on the outcome of a race.